About the Clinic

A caring team of practitioners dedicated to helping people with eating, weight and food concerns.

When issues around food and eating become dominant in a person’s life, it can prevent them from engaging with loved ones in a meaningful way, enjoying life’s pleasures, fulfilling their true potential, and even completing basic day-to-day tasks and routines.

If this sounds like you or someone you are concerned about, Centre for Integrative Health is here to deliver the specialist support, information and treatment needed to overcome concerns about food, exercise, and physical appearance and achieve health and happiness.

Our practitioners are highly skilled in the assessment and treatment of a range of physical and emotional health conditions that affect people of all ages, genders, sizes, and from all walks of life. Our team has a particular interest and specialised training in those conditions concerning food, eating, exercise, and body-image.

It is our commitment to on-going professional development, practice of evidence-based treatments and our dedication to our clients that empowers individuals to overcome the barriers they are experiencing and live a life that is meaningful to them.

Our tailored treatment plans and services, not only support our clients, but also provide their families with peace of mind and clarity throughout the journey.

If you have any queries about how we can help, or any other aspect of the recovery process, please do not hesitate to reach out to us for a free 15-minute phone consultation.

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You might not be hungry, you may not “need it” but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have it.  Food is more than nutrition and energy. 
Food is pleasurable. 
Food is comforting. 
Food brings us together.  This Easter, CFIH wishes you hot cross buns, chocolates, and all the other delicious delights accompanying this time of year enjoyed guilt free.
Many people with eating disorders also experience social anxiety. In fact in many cases, the eating disorder may have onset as a subconscious means of avoiding the negative judgement anticipated in social situations (ie., being judged for ones weight/shape or food choices). In a twist of irony however, such individuals then find themselves attracting unwanted attention for the weight they’ve lost or the food they’ve avoided.  Fortunately, a good mental health practitioner can assist you in developing effective strategies to support you in resolving your social anxiety.
During a session with one of my clients who is towards the end of her recovery journey, we had a powerful and enlightening conversation that I wanted to share in hope that there were takeaway points for others struggling in a similar way.  Me: "I've noticed that in this last phase of treatment, you often start sentences or respond to questions with "It's hard but.." Have you noticed that? What do you make of that?"  Client: "It IS hard. It's all hard. Recovery is hard, feelings are hard, LIFE is hard. Although having Anorexia was challenging in its own way, comparatively, it was EASY. Life with Anorexia was small and tightly controlled. When your biggest problem is that you weigh too much or have eaten too much, life is simple and within your control. Life without Anorexia means acknowledging and dealing with my social anxiety and fear of intimacy, my low self-esteem and my endless insecurities. That is HARD.  Me: "You've often bemoaned how your treatment team always promised that you would feel better once you restored your weight and yet, that wasn't your experience. It sounds like you're now saying that although your pain is still there, you know now that your weight/shape actually isn't the cause of your discontent. Or at least not the whole problem. Is that right?"  Client: "Yes, that's right. I suppose the problem was always there but my eating disorder distracted me from it".  Me: "So, I'm curious... knowing that recovery doesn't necessarily make you feel better, what would you tell someone with an eating disorder if you were one of their treating professionals?"  Client: "Recovery won't make your problems go away. Recovery will make your problems worth having. Recovery will be hard but it will be worth it."
You can’t win the day on an empty stomach!  Today we discovered the built-in food compartment filled with snacks in Kate Lane’s work bag that ensures she remains adequately fuelled throughout her busy days.  What are your life hacks for ensuring your daily meals and snacks don’t get missed?
Let's start the week off right!  Tag someone who needs to be reminded that they are wonderful - exactly as they are!
When we say “I feel ‘fat’” what we usually mean is “I feel insecure”, “I feel ashamed”, “I feel inadequate” or “I feel uncomfortable”.  It’s hardly surprising then that the response we receive from others (“You look great”) often make us feel worse (i.e., misunderstood, unheard, alone) rather than better.  Next time you’re tempted to proclaim that you feel “fat”, we challenge you to dig a little deeper and find a word that better describes your emotional experience so that the people who love you have a better chance of understanding, validating, and connecting with you.
Before exercise can be enjoyed intuitively, it must be disentangled from feelings of guilt, shame, and obligation.  Sunday bike rides with one of my nearest and dearest 🥰  Ps. We may have accidentally ended up on the track of today’s #brisbanecyclingfestival event but Chrystle’s common sense circumvented me illegitimately crossing the finish line 🙅🏻‍♀️
May your weekends be filled with those things of true importance 🙏🏼
I'm not intending to be "difficult", "emotional", or "confrontational" when I ask that you don't comment on my appearance, talk to me about dieting or weight loss, or narrate my food choices. I am protecting my emotional health and doing what I can to prevent the relapse of my eating disorder. #sorrynotsorry
Bringing back a popular post for IBS Awareness month!  Many of our clients living with an eating disorder will experience disruption to normal gut function at some point. So what's the deal with the gas/pain/constipation/diarrhoea/reflux/appetite changes? Is there anything to be done to reduce symptoms?  CFIH Dietitian Kate Lane has been taking a deep dive into this topic recently so if these questions are familiar to you, or you'd like to know more about functional gut issues and eating disorders, comment below or head to our Insta story to vote so we can hit her up for some content!

Our Staff

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Kate Pollard – Accredited Practising Dietitian

Kate Pollard – Accredited Practising Dietitian

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Kate Lane – Accredited Practising Dietitian

Kate Lane – Accredited Practising Dietitian

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Dr Hollie Shannon – Clinical Psychologist

Dr Hollie Shannon – Clinical Psychologist

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Ashleigh Olive – General Psychologist

Ashleigh Olive – General Psychologist

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Danica Adolfsson – Clinical Psychologist

Danica Adolfsson – Clinical Psychologist

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Lily Robinson – Psychologist, Clinical Psychology Registrar

Lily Robinson – Psychologist, Clinical Psychology Registrar

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Dr. Kiera Buchanan – Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Kiera Buchanan – Clinical Psychologist

Ashleigh Olive

To be authentic, accepting, and committed to supporting others so that they feel encouraged to share, be heard, and continue to grow in the face of adversity. Read More

Alanah Dobinson

To support people to overcome the barriers preventing them from achieving their full potential. Read More

Kate Pollard

To help others see that appearance does not have to determine their value and worth so that they know that they are not just enough but their uniqueness makes them incredible – just as they are. Read More

Dr Hollie Shannon

To guide and nurture people at their most vulnerable so that they become their intended self sooner and make the most of their life. Read More

Katie Gegg

To offer support to young girls and women to develop their self-worth beyond appearance and to never feel alone in their struggles. Read More

Carly Leverington

To empower and advocate for freedom and healing from diet culture so individuals may come to love and make peace with their true selves. Read More

Dr Andi Alperin

To empower and advocate for freedom and healing from diet culture so individuals may come to love and make peace with their true selves. Read More

Dr Kiera Buchanan

To create a space where people can be understood so that they can become who they want to be. Read More

Our Values

Integrity with every action;
Excellence driven by humility;
To practice what we preach;
To inspire global change;
To recognise that we’re all in it together.

Embark on your journey towards a happier, healthier you.

If you are referring a client, please contact us.

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