About the Clinic

A caring team of practitioners dedicated to helping people with eating, weight and food concerns.

When issues around food and eating become dominant in a person’s life, it can prevent them from engaging with loved ones in a meaningful way, enjoying life’s pleasures, fulfilling their true potential, and even completing basic day-to-day tasks and routines.

If this sounds like you or someone you are concerned about, Centre for Integrative Health is here to deliver the specialist support, information and treatment needed to overcome concerns about food, exercise, and physical appearance and achieve health and happiness.

Our practitioners are highly skilled in the assessment and treatment of a range of physical and emotional health conditions that affect people of all ages, genders, sizes, and from all walks of life. Our team has a particular interest and specialised training in those conditions concerning food, eating, exercise, and body-image.

It is our commitment to on-going professional development, practice of evidence-based treatments and our dedication to our clients that empowers individuals to overcome the barriers they are experiencing and live a life that is meaningful to them.

Our tailored treatment plans and services, not only support our clients, but also provide their families with peace of mind and clarity throughout the journey.

If you have any queries about how we can help, or any other aspect of the recovery process, please do not hesitate to reach out to us for a free 15-minute phone consultation.

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Reachers within the Body Image, Eating and Weight Clinical Research Team at Australian Catholic University are developing a measure of weight stigma in an effort to improve understanding and prevention of weight stigma and its effects. The researchers are looking for adults aged 18-65 years of any weight to complete an online questionnaire as part of this process. The questionnaire should take no more than 60 minutes to complete and participants will go into a draw to win an iPad mini. If you are interested, further information can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/WeightStigmaStudy
I recently wrapped up treatment with an adolescent boy who presented with Anorexia Nervosa. During our final session in which we were reviewing his journey from the onset of the illness until now, I raised the topic of 'insight'. My client made an incredibly valid but chilling point that has sat with me ever since. One which I believe we as a society need to consider if we are going to be effective in reducing the rates of eating disorders and their related condition. "I see now that I lacked insight into how unwell I was", my client admitted. "In saying that however", he continued "it was really confusing time for me in which I was receiving a lot of conflicting information". My client went on to recount, "One Sunday afternoon I was at a family BBQ in which an adult male whom I look up to approached me enthusiastically and said 'DUDEEE! You're looking SO good!'. The following day I was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa. The doctors said I could have died". I would like to say that these stories are few and far between but the sad reality is that we hear them quite a lot. Over the past decade, society has placed increasingly more unrealistic demands on what it means to "look good" or to "be fit". The male ideal has become increasingly leaner and more muscular - making it increasingly more unattainable and leading to increasingly more people engaging in unhealthy behaviours in their efforts to obtain it. If we are going to be effective in reducing the rates of body-image issues (along with the anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, suicidality, and interpersonal issues associated with them) we need an overhaul of sociocultural ideals. #menshealth #mentalhealth #bodyimage #eatingdisorderawareness #eatingdisoderrecovery #prevention #menstruggletoo #itaintweaktospeak #mensmeantalhealth #psychology
Just as we acquire a dodgy hip or a crook knee through the course of our lives that requires attention and rehabilitation, so too do we acquire emotional injuries. No matter how loving our upbringing or how resilient our temperament, none of us make it through life without experiencing some form of trauma. You wouldn't hesitate to see a physio to help you rehabilitate a physical injury. Nor should you be reluctant to see a mental-health practitioner to support you in resolving emotional wounds. #ItAintWeakToSpeak #MentalHealthIsHealth
Reason #1247 to not praise weight loss: an observable change in weight or shape rarely tells the full story. I once had a woman tell me that she lost a significant amount of weight following the unexpected passing of her husband. Absolutely grief-stricken, the woman was barely able to eat, sleep, or attend to her basic hygiene needs for a period of time. Subsequently, she lost a large amount of weight in a short period of time. Already feeling lonely as a result of losing the love of her life, the woman came to feel increasingly alone through the misattunement of others as they dismissed her pain with enthusiastic comments about her weightloss. The fact that we automatically praise someone for weight loss without stopping to reflect on the many possible causes of someone's drastic change in weight and shape is both alarming and depressing. If you notice that someone's weight or shape had drastically changed, you might like to attend to the reasons behind the change as opposed to the weight itself. You might say something along the lines of "You appear to have lost a lot of weight. Is everything ok? Do you want to talk about what's changed for you?"
C'mon! Doesn't it infuriate you even a little that the entire human race is referred to as "mankind"? Imagine the world changes we could create if we redirected the time and energy focused on our appearance insecurities!
WE'RE HIRING! We are looking for an experienced dietitian with a passion for and experience in the treatment of eating disorders and body-image concerns. Should you be successful in your application, your role will involve providing assessments and interventions for children and adults across the lifespan presenting with concerns with food, eating, exercise, or weight and shape. Initially, this role will be a part-time position, with the intention to progress to full-time. We are seeking a dietitian who has the capacity to work across both our Brisbane and Sunshine Coast clinics. For more details and to apply, see: https://www.seek.com.au/job/41351477?_ga=2.231084383.1734692913.1589871300-1437719540.1589871300
"Sure, I was hot. But I was also a boring, self-absorbed arsehole". This was my client's reflection as she looked back over the period of her life that she spent preoccupied with suppressing her weight. The effort that goes into fighting one's biology is often at the expense of one's ability to experience joy and spontaneity, to express consideration for and thoughtfulness of others, to dream of a future and to conjure up new ideas. While it might be hard to conceptualise being happier when your body is (by sociocultural standards) less attractive, the truth is that the positives of living a full and interesting life outweigh (pardon the pun) any joy that comes from controlling your weight/shape.
Researchers at Western Sydney University are seeking the input of those with a lived experience of an eating disorder in their quest to develop a new body-image questionnaire. You can register your interest in participating here: https://qfreeaccountssjc1.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3ZXSSP9Bah0xLud
One of the many reasons that so many people with eating disorders go undiagnosed and untreated is that society has such a distorted view of what an eating disorder actually "looks like". In my time working in the field, I have heard the following descriptions of individuals who were later found to be acutely unwell with an eating disorder: *"She doesn't look 'anorexic'. She just looks like she has some sort of disease". *"She isn't very thin and she still eats but she is fainting all the time" *"I thought maybe he had Leukaemia. I didn't even consider it might be Anorexia Nervosa". If you think that you're not "thin enough" to have an eating disorder, please know that this is (sadly) a common experience. However, we are also here to reassure you that your weight/shape does not reflect your severity of illness or your deservedness for treatment. Still unsure? The team at CFIH are happy to offer obligation-free 1-off assessments for anyone who thinks that they (or someone they know) might be experiencing an eating disorder but are unsure about commencing treatment.
We jumped the gun last week but have just received an update that this segment is being aired on Ten News tonight. @channeltennews

Our Staff

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Dr Nga Tran – Psychiatrist

Dr Nga Tran – Psychiatrist

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Kate Gough (nee Pollard) Senior Accredited Practicing Dietitian and Nutritionist

Kate Gough (nee Pollard) Senior Accredited Practicing Dietitian and Nutritionist

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Vera Keatley – Psychologist

Vera Keatley – Psychologist

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Audrey Rafflet – Psychologist

Audrey Rafflet – Psychologist

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Kate Lane – Accredited Practicing Dietitian, Nutritionist

Kate Lane – Accredited Practicing Dietitian, Nutritionist

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Ashleigh Olive – Psychologist

Ashleigh Olive – Psychologist

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Danica Adolfsson – Clinical Psychologist

Danica Adolfsson – Clinical Psychologist

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Dr. Kiera Buchanan – Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Kiera Buchanan – Clinical Psychologist

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Emma Reid – Psychologist

Emma Reid – Psychologist

Ashleigh Olive

To be authentic, accepting, and committed to supporting others so that they feel encouraged to share, be heard, and continue to grow in the face of adversity. Read More

Alanah Dobinson

To support people to overcome the barriers preventing them from achieving their full potential. Read More

Kate Pollard

To help others see that appearance does not have to determine their value and worth so that they know that they are not just enough but their uniqueness makes them incredible – just as they are. Read More

Dr Hollie Shannon

To guide and nurture people at their most vulnerable so that they become their intended self sooner and make the most of their life. Read More

Katie Gegg

To offer support to young girls and women to develop their self-worth beyond appearance and to never feel alone in their struggles. Read More

Carly Leverington

To empower and advocate for freedom and healing from diet culture so individuals may come to love and make peace with their true selves. Read More

Dr Andi Alperin

To empower and advocate for freedom and healing from diet culture so individuals may come to love and make peace with their true selves. Read More

Dr Kiera Buchanan

To create a space where people can be understood so that they can become who they want to be. Read More

Our Values

Integrity with every action;
Excellence driven by humility;
To practice what we preach;
To inspire global change;
To recognise that we’re all in it together.

 

Our Vision

A world for everybody.

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Our Mission

To liberate society from eating
and body image concerns.

 

Embark on your journey towards a happier, healthier you.

If you are referring a client, please contact us.

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